How to Leverage Technology in the Classroom

My daughter, a first grader, keeps asking me for a phone. “So many kids have them!” and I wonder, “For what?” but I know the answer: for everything. Technology is everywhere. It’s in classrooms, churches, the bus, the dinner table. Everywhere. And rather than resisting it, there are some key things that teachers, in particular, can do to leverage the growing trend for electronic classrooms to work in their favor. Here are a few of those things you might consider:

1. Have a Clear Electronics Policy in Place

No matter how much you care about your students, as a teacher, you know realistically that if given free reign of a tablet or laptop, any kid from the age of 5 to 18 (and beyond!) is going to return the device at the end of the day with the thing loaded with a variety of farm heroes, exploding candies, pictures of doe-eyed kids with flower crowns…and not to date myself even further, but I have no idea what kids are playing these days. Whatever it is, without some clear boundaries in place, it’s not going to be what you’re teaching them.

So first things first, when you come to embrace technology in your classroom, lay out a clear electronics policy. What are the consequences of excessive or inappropriate technology use? What tools are okay to use and which are strict no-nos? If you hear technology knocking at your classroom door, it might be time to get together with your school or district IT professional and determine what constitutes “acceptable use” in your school.

2. Create Natural Consequences for Misuse

With any luck, your students are growing up in environments where they understand that every action has a natural consequence. According to Edutopia, “a disruption should always be a bigger headache to the student than to you as a teacher.” When our 6-year-old is acting out like 6-year-olds often do, my husband will sometimes say, “You better stop that or you won’t go to the park tomorrow!” This is frustrating because the consequence of her action is more of a headache to me than it is to her. No park tomorrow means “hang out with mom and push every button you know she has.” Kids need consequences that are relevant to them without putting a burden on someone else.

In a classroom setting, if a student is using technology for something other than schoolwork, the consequence might be that the device is taken away. If they use tablets to take notes, then the natural consequence of misusing it is that they have to use pen and paper. If students are using devices to create presentations, they have the option of completing the project at home or again, pulling out the stone-age tools of pen and paper and creating a rough draft that way.

3. Use Your Powers for Good

With recent hurricanes ravaging the south, and the strongest earthquake in Mexico in a century shaking up and destroying homes south of the border, there is no shortage of terrible things happening. People all over the country and all over the world need help, and no student is too small or too young to make a significant impact. Consider using technology to teach your students the value of humanitarian aid. No matter the subject you teach, there are things your students can do to leverage technology to help people around the world.

To cite a few examples, FirstGiving, Pledgie, and GoFundMe exists for purposes just like this. DonorsChoose is another one that is specifically for classrooms if you have a project that needs funding or just to raise awareness or bring support to fellow educators. Students can use these tools to create awareness of what is going on in the world, or they can use them to facilitate projects of their own.

4. Make Classroom Content Shareable

There are several examples of classrooms across the country that are doing this perfectly. Teachers are now posting documents such as syllabi online for parents to review. Some schools even offer parent accounts so parents can track their child’s progress. Even students are able to collaborate using cloud-based software to work on and complete projects together.

Students are going to need to be able to navigate software programs and share ideas as they go through school and beyond, and as they grow in their professions. Whether this looks like a classroom website that all students can post homework assignments or class notes, or a Facebook page where students can bounce ideas off each other, we have seen firsthand the significant results of educators creating and promoting shareable tech.

 

6 Internet Safety Tips for Teachers

An increasing number of elementary schools across the country have access to the internet. We live in a digital age and students need to learn about this valued tool early. As a teacher, your role is an important one: How do you teach kids about the valuable tool and resource that the internet is while leaving out all the bad stuff it can bring? Here are a few ideas.

1. Read and reference your school district Acceptable Use Policy (AUP).

First, make sure you are familiar with your school and district’s guidelines for proper internet use. You can either download your school district’s AUP online or get it from a school administrator. Besides informing you of what activity on the school computers is acceptable and what is not, the AUP will have great information you can use in your lessons on internet and computer use.

2. Teach students about legal issues surrounding internet use.

The internet is a massive tool and with that comes a lot of legal issues if it is not handled properly. Nowadays, every student knows what Facebook is. Most of them probably know how to unlock a smartphone or tablet, and many of them can open a webpage and play online games. But very few know about key legal issues related to their internet use. As a teacher, be sure your students are not just learning about how to use the internet, but also about plagiarism and copyright issues, Creative Commons, and how to effectively use the internet to perform research.

3. Have a lesson on internet safety.

Actually, have several lessons on internet safety. In this day and age, your students are not just accessing the internet from school under your ever-watchful eye. They may be accessing it at home or with friends, and they may or may not be supervised while they’re doing it. Make sure students are aware of internet safety issues and that you talk about it in each of your lessons. Websites such as the Federal Trade Commission and NetSmartz are good resources for additional tips and lesson ideas.

4. Know what they’re up to when you’re not around.

To speak to the previous point, students are not just using the internet at school. Keep informed of what students are doing online when you aren’t watching them. You can be more aware of issues your students are facing if you know what they’re doing when their internet use is unsupervised.

5. Protect your online identity.

As a teacher, you have a responsibility to be a role model to your students, offline as well as online. Make sure that you have strong passwords in place, and don’t put anything online that you wouldn’t want your students or their parents to see. Never add students or their parents as friends or followers on your social media profiles.

6. Have an open-door policy about cyberbullying and internet safety.

Ultimately, you need to be a resource for students and their parents if questions arise. A shocking 52 percent of young people in the United States report that they have experienced cyberbullying, and one-third of those kids said they had received online threats. If a student or their parents come to you with cyberbullying or internet safety concerns, make sure to address them. Get administration involved if possible. Encourage your students and their parents to talk to you if there is a concern about internet safety.

Essentially, teaching your students about safe internet use is extremely important, whether you are using the internet in your classroom or not. As a teacher, you need to be a trusted source for your students so they can stay safe—online and off.

Lesson Ideas: Blending Social Studies and ELA

One thing that we frequently discuss at Studies Weekly in our personal conversations, individual department meetings, and companywide events is the importance of social studies education. And why wouldn’t we? This is what we do every day.

To us, social studies is about more than teaching kids the states and capitals. It’s more than just learning the geography of your state or all the names and terms of the presidents. Incorporating English Language Arts into your social studies can and should be done as a richer education experience. Here are five ideas to blend ELA learning with your social studies lessons:

1. Act It Out

After reading their Studies Weekly booklets for the week, assign students a literary genre. They will then choose an article from their publication and present it to the class. For instance, they can write a poem about Christopher Columbus and recite it or act it out. Students can create a mystery story relating to the forming of their state, or a comedy sketch about the three branches of government.

Encourage students to get creative with props and the storyline, but remind them to showcase what they learned about their chosen topic.

This teaches the following ELA areas: Speaking; Writing; Reading; Listening; Analysis; Research and Citations; Art, Activities and Projects; Viewing; and Literary Genres.

2. Create a Video Journal

After reading their Studies Weekly booklets for the week, have them create video journals. This is easier to do if students have access to computers or tablets. If they don’t have access, they can create a storyboard of what would transpire in the video. The goal is not a perfect analysis of the event or the historical figure you are studying.

Video journals build fluency, prepare students for discussions, and help students practice conversation. They teach the following ELA areas: Speaking, Listening, Analysis, and Viewing.

3. Have A Debate

Set up a debate in your elementary school class. This is going to look different depending on which grade you’re teaching. A fourth grader’s understanding of the Emancipation Proclamation, for instance, will be a lot different from a sixth grader’s, but this doesn’t mean it’s impossible for them to learn it and talk about what they learned.

Have students on either side research the topic and debate the pros and cons, discuss the implications and originations of the subject, and try to come up with a compromise.

This teaches the following ELA areas: Speaking, Writing, Reading, Listening, Analysis, and Research and Citations.

4. Hold a Round Table Discussion

Have all the students choose one of the articles in the Studies Weekly booklet for that week. After thoroughly reading and analyzing the article and its subject, put all the desks or chairs in the classroom in a circle.

With their booklets in front of them, encourage the students to open up a dialogue about what they read. Encourage them to use other sources to pull information and cite from if needed to expound their point.

This teaches the following ELA areas: Speaking, Reading, Analysis, and Research and Citations.

5. Write to a Historical Pen Pal

After reading their Studies Weekly booklets for the week, have students choose a historical pen pal or when relevant, a current political figure.

Once a week, students will write to a historical figure that they have chosen to learn more about. Encourage the students to draw pictures or incorporate diagrams, and ask questions.

Once completed, pass out the letters to a different classmate and have them respond back as if they were the historical figure.

This teaches the following ELA areas: Writing, Reading, Analysis, Research and Citations, and Art, Activities, and Projects.

Newly Formed Diversity Board

We have implemented a new Diversity Board to our product development team. We organized the board to integrate and maintain cultural competence within our curriculum materials.

The Board Members

Studies Weekly is one of only a handful of educational companies to incorporate a Diversity Board onto its team. “Our diversity board helps us to ensure that our new content is culturally inclusive, sensitive and reflects our readership,” said Chief Product Officer, Kim Mogilevsky.

The Diversity Board is made up of educators and advocates who have served in various capacities working with nonprofit organizations, school district diversity and equity departments and the White House. Each member brings a wide variety of expertise and experience in multicultural education and plays a crucial role in providing social and cultural awareness.

Our Purpose & Goals

America’s students are at the heart of why we have a Diversity Board. “Our new curriculum is focused on increasing students’ on-task behavior and their willingness to engage with relevant-to-them content, which we believe will boost reading levels and test scores,” said Mogilevsky. “We love our students and in an ever-diversifying country we need to provide them with the best educational materials they can possibly receive.”

A recent report by the Century Foundation confirms our thinking. Having multiple vantage points helps students think critically and “develop greater tolerance for different ways of understanding issues.” Furthermore, the study found that such an exposure created “positive academic outcomes.”

The board aims to maintain diversity and equity in terms of race, people with disabilities, age groups, sexual and gender identities, family structures, religious and political views and socio-economic status. We believe in constantly improving and reviewing our publications so that the content reflects the varied lives and perspectives of the students who read them.

To learn more about our Diversity Board members visit www.studiesweekly.com/diversity-board

Appointment of New CEO: John McCurdy

John McCurdy has been appointed the new Chief Executive Officer effective May 1, 2018. McCurdy succeeds Studies Weekly’s previous CEO, Ed Rickers, who announced his desire to step down and retire after almost 20 years of continuous service to the company.

“My role is to continue to safeguard the vision of Studies Weekly and, when the timing is right, unveil more of that vision. There’s definitely a lot more to do,” said former CEO, Ed Rickers.

Rickers has all confidence in McCurdy and his vision for Studies Weekly. “I’ve observed John’s successful career since 1996. We have so much in common in the way we think and believe. Some people are wordsmiths, John is a ‘people smither’ and I think he’s part Jedi. As Yoda would say, ‘Understand the Studies Weekly vision to make a difference for students, he does.’” Studies weekly's new CEO, John McCurdy.

McCurdy has spent the last 29 years in the technology industry with roles spanning from Area Sales Representative to Sr. Vice President of Worldwide Sales. He comes experienced in team development,  strategy, operations and channel programs. John has worked with some of the largest companies in the world in their selection and implementation of technology solutions to increase productivity in computer security, along with mobile and wireless application connectivity. McCurdy now joins Studies Weekly after playing a consultative role with the company.

“The educational process has always been a passion of mine,” said McCurdy. “A long time ago, I learned that what many call entertainment, also serves as education in disguise. If students aren’t learning the way we teach, then we must adjust and teach the way they learn. In today’s world of amazing innovations, the educational process may be evolving, but the fundamentals of connecting with the student remain the same. When the educational process is entertaining, the pace at which the student learns increases.”

McCurdy graduated from Brigham Young University in Business Management with an emphasis in Finance and Marketing. He and his wife, Deborah, are the parents of five children and grandparents of three.

State Standards are Covered with Studies Weekly

At Studies Weekly, we often tout the phrase that our product is created “by teachers, for teachers.” Specifically, this means that our staff consists of veteran teachers who know what is important to you as a teacher. This includes strict compliance with state standards.

Process Ensures Standards Compliance

Each of our publications goes through a rigorous process to ensure compliance with the unique standards for your state. Recent statewide adoptions in recent months by California and Florida have proven that our publications can stand up to rigorous standards to teach your students social studies and the English Language Arts concurrently.

State Standards for Social Studies and ELA

In many schools across the country, social studies is, unfortunately, becoming a dying subject. On the other hand, English Language Arts (ELA) is still alive and well. Studies Weekly materials include many ELA standards. We designed them this way to ensure a robust and well-rounded ELA and social studies education for your students. Studies Weekly is a social studies curriculum that we designed to be taught during the literacy block.

Start Your Free Trial

Click here to start your free trial of Studies Weekly online products to see how we stack up to your state standards. You can also order a free sample of our print versions here.

 

Parent Accounts: Getting the Most Out of Studies Weekly

increase parent involvement with parent accounts at studies weekly As a teacher, you know that parent involvement is one of the key indicators in the value of your students’ education. You also know firsthand that your students’ parents can either be your greatest allies or present difficult hurdles into your teaching.

After several years of experience with our online tool, and after feedback from some of our valued educators, we added the awesome Parent Accounts feature. The ability to create Parent Accounts is one of the greatest tools that we have available to you and your students’ parents. This tool allows parents to closely monitor how their kids are doing and how they’re using Studies Weekly online resources.

Here are some of the important things you should know about Parent Accounts. These factors will help you increase parent involvement in your classroom, and give everyone a better education experience.

1. Setting up Parent Accounts is easy.

First, login to your Teacher Account at Studies Weekly. As a reminder, you can register by clicking here and filling out your information. If you have a subscription to the Studies Weekly print publication, then your online account access is included for free.

Once you have logged in, click on the CLASSES tab at the top of the page. Click on the class name on the lefthand side. Your roster will look similar to this:

From there, click on the Manage Parents tab to add, delete, or change parent information.

To add a parent to your student, click on the + Add Parent button on the right.

Enter the parent’s name and email address, then click the Send Invite button. The parent will get an email similar to the message below. Once they click the link, their Parent Account will be active.

2. Parents can login from anywhere.

Studies Weekly Online is web-based software, which means that parents can access their Parent Accounts from anywhere they have internet access. Our software is designed to be used across both mobile and desktop, so whether at home or on-the-go, parents can easily access their child’s information.

3. It includes a built-in messaging feature.

One of the trickiest parts of teaching is trying to ensure that information conveyed to students makes it home. With Parent Accounts, you add parents to your students’ accounts and communicate with the entire class or with specific parents. You can send weekly reminders to your students’ parents about tests coming up, reading assignments, and more.

4. It increases parent involvement.

One of the best ways to increase parent involvement is to get students and their parents talking about school and online activities. Encourage parents and students to use and talk about the online Parent Accounts. We designed this tool to promote dialogue, increase parent involvement, and provide a more robust student experience.

5. It is completely transparent.

Parent Accounts give parents the option to see what their students are doing within the Studies Weekly tool. With the Parents Account portal, parents can track their child’s account to see how they did on assessments, rewards accumulation, and view notes and highlights in their reading.

6. Student information is private and safe.

We live in a digital age and sensitive information is shot across the internet every second. Therefore, the privacy and security of our data and certainly our children’s data is paramount. Rest assured that with the Parents Accounts, your students’ information is private.Our two-step verification built into our parent registration process ensures that no student data is transferred outside the teacher-parent relationship. No one has access to your child’s information but you and their parents.

If you’re looking for a robust curriculum that complies with state standards, is engaging for your kids, and also increases parent involvement, order your free 30-day trial of Studies Weekly online and request your free sample today.

Increase Critical Thinking with Studies Weekly

Critical thinking is more than just being able to think clearly about a topic or a problem. It is a crucial life skill that every student must learn.

Many of our students will not learn this essential skill at home, so it becomes extraordinarily important to increase critical thinking at school. (In the meantime, you can get parents more engaged with our Parent Accounts.)

Teachers have actually been using Studies Weekly to incorporate critical thinking skills in their classrooms for decades. Here are some ideas that we’ve come across.

1. Start by Asking a Question

The easiest way to increase critical thinking in your students is to begin your lesson with an open-ended question. The question should require some research and problem solving.

One thing we encourage teachers to do is have students read an article out of their Studies Weekly and discuss it as a class. What are the similarities between the people in the article and your students? What might your students do differently for alternative outcome?

2. Have Students Collaborate

Collaboration is not only an essential skill for critical thinking, but it will serve your students well to learn now how to cooperate with peers. As students gather around their Studies Weekly and discuss a problem, they are able to come to conclusions and process information by learning from their peers.

3. Hold a Mock Debate

Holding a debate is a great way to increase critical thinking about both sides of an issue. Take an issue from your Studies Weekly publications for the week and have students discuss each side. Ask a question and have students take turns debating their stance.

If students are up for it (older kids might be “too cool” at this point so gauge what will work best for your class!), you could even have them role play both sides. Seeing it from another perspective can be a great way to get students thinking analytically and creatively about a problem or issue.

4. Increase Critical Thinking Through Information Fluency

Information fluency is a key ingredient in critical thinking. This involves knowing how to use the information you gather to determine what is useful and appropriate, and what is not. When you ask your question at the beginning of the lesson, pull out some phrases from the Studies Weekly text and write them on the board. Have students decide based on the question which pieces of information are useful and which are not.

5. Teach Open-Ended Problem-Solving

Assign a student or a group of students a problem. Perhaps they have to build a tower or hat out of unrelated out of unrelated, very different ingredients. The goal of the project is to get students learning how to problem solve. There will be a lot of trial and error and discovery, as students are forced to try different things to accomplish the goal.

Critical thinking is an essential skill for your students to have a successful adult life. For more of our classroom ideas and to download some free lesson plans, subscribe to our newsletter. Or you can sign up for a free trial of Studies Weekly.

Getting the Most Out of Your Studies Weekly Account

Did you know your Studies Weekly print publications already have a subscription to our online tool? We are always surprised to find out when teachers who have been using Studies Weekly print materials for years are not also taking advantage of the online side of their products!

Whether you are a parent, teacher, or even a student, Studies Weekly’s online format is user-friendly and thoughtfully designed. Here are some of the different functionalities available to you through Studies Weekly online for your respective role.

Teachers

Registering and logging in is easy. If you have a Studies Weekly print publication in your classroom, then your online account already exists; you just have to go in and register to “activate” it. You can find instructions on registering in this article.

Here are some of the key features of your online account:

1. Give assessments

Each week, we provide assessments that correlate with the article. This can be accessed by clicking on the Reading tab and selecting the publication you’re using. You will then have the option to activate and edit the test, as shown:

When the test is activated, your students will be able to go in and take it. While testing, their responses will autosave every time a student types into a field or selects an answer.

2. Read along with students

We provide an auto-reader that will read aloud when you click the play icon. Each word is highlighted when read so that students can follow along with ease.

Not only does it help with student comprehension but it also comes in handy when your voice needs a break. We have a wide range of accents and characters to keep students entertained and engaged with the topic being discussed.

3. Get a picture of student progress

Studies Weekly online includes a robust reporting structure. Select your class from the right-hand side of your screen, to view your list of students. Just click on the Reports link in the top right corner to access the reports for your class:

Alternatively, you can access all of your reports for all of your classes by clicking on the Reports tab at the top of any page once you have logged into your Studies Weekly online teacher account:

For your reports, you have two tabs at the top: 1) SLI (Student Learning Index) Report; and 2) Utilization Report. You have the option to export student report data to Excel in CSV format or view in a browser by selecting Search. Either view of the report will give you a clear picture of what your students are working on and how they’re progressing.

4. Measure Students’ Engagement

With the new online student reporting tools within our Gradebook, you can see all of the students’ activities in each of your classes on one screen. This tool will give you a snapshot of which of your students are participating heavily and which ones might need a little more encouragement.

With this tool, you can also see which test questions students might be struggling with, and which answers they might have just skipped over.

5. Share Student Progress with Parents

Parents love to know how their child is doing in class. With the new online student reporting tools, you can export student data to Excel and share with parents individually. For a student who is struggling, seeing a snapshot of their engagement may be just what their parents need.

Furthermore, you can increase parent involvement with our Parent Accounts. This tool allows parents to closely monitor how their kids are doing and how they’re using Studies Weekly’s online resources.

6. Take advantage of professional development opportunities.

Once you have logged in to your teacher account on Studies Weekly, you’ll have instant access to all of our professional development articles and videos. The Professional Development Training link is front and center for your convenience. Start logging those hours!

The Professional Development Training link has moved to the top for easier accessibility.
The Professional Development Training link has moved to the top for easier accessibility.

Within the professional development tab, clicking on the module itself will launch right in your browser. Alternatively, we have provided a download link in the bottom right corner of each module so you can download and view later.

The Teacher Professional Development on Demand page has gotten a whole new look.
The Professional Development on Demand page has gotten a whole new look.

We make it easy to filter your results so you only see the type of media that you want to see. Under “Show only these types” at the top of the site, clicking these options will eliminate that option from your filter. Click on the other two options to narrow down your filter to the one you want.

You can perform a search using the search box on the upper lefthand side. Note that the search box in the upper right will search the entire Studies Weekly site. The one on the left will search Professional Development files only.

Students

Most classrooms in the U.S. are connected to the internet today. The internet can be a significant online learning tool in your classroom, but because different students learn at different speeds and in different ways, tools that teach using a variety of methods are extremely important.

To facilitate the best online learning, Studies Weekly designed and created Student Accounts. Student Accounts allow students to work through our online materials at their pace in the way that they understand it best. Here are a few key features of our Student Accounts that will keep students more engaged and improve their learning.

1. Bilingual Content

Students who are English Language Learners (ELLs) make up a large population of our nation’s schools. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, Spanish is the primary language spoken at home for 3.7 million students or about 7.6 percent of students in grades K-12 in the United States. The percentage of ELL students in certain states such as California is as high as 25 percent.

With this in mind, and to serve our Spanish immersion classrooms that use Studies Weekly, our online reading sections and assessments are available in Spanish.

To view the Spanish language versions of the publications, click “Reading” at the top of the page and collapse the tab labeled “Leveled Readers.”

2. Highlighting

Students are able to highlight passages of text. Teachers make this tool even more valuable when they incorporate highlighting into their lessons.

For instance, you can have students highlight the verbs as they see them in their reading, or highlight all of the proper nouns they see throughout the copy. This fulfills many of the ELA standards while teaching students essential social studies concepts.

3. Assessments

To administer assessments to your students, just go into your Teacher Account and activate the test for the section you are working on. The reading sections prepare students for the questions at the end of the unit.

One of the benefits of the assessments is that they utilize a variety of question types: drag and drop, fill in the blank, true or false, multiple choice, etc. We have closely assessed the standards to make sure that both our digital and print materials adhere closely to the standards for each state.

4. Rewards

Parents and teachers know that the best way to motivate children is through rewarding positive behavior. As students complete their reading or listening to the text, they earn virtual coin rewards. Students will also have to search the site to earn some of the rewards. (Don’t worry, we give pretty good clues!)

Students can redeem their rewards for items for a virtual pet.

Many of the reading sections also include games. Students can play developmentally appropriate games such as MisSpilled, a game that helps students identify misspelled and correctly spelled words. There are also crossword puzzles that incorporate ideas and vocabulary from the reading.

5. Online Learning Progress Tracking

As a kid, few things are quite as frustrating as not being able to track progress. (Ever been on a road trip with a 6-year-old? Do the words “Are we there yet?” set off any alarms?)  With our online tool, students can track their own progress. Students will get through the material and retain more of it when they can see their progress nearing the finish line.

6. Audio & Visual Features

The content in our online component is identical to the print publications you receive in your classroom each week. With the online tool, however, the content has sound and visual components as well. We also have thousands of videos, and most likely, at least one that correlates with each topic.

We understand you often need to cater to your students’ unique personalities and learning styles. That’s why we’ve included these options to help you.

To start setting up your Student Accounts, register or login to Studies Weekly online.

 

See Our Primary Source Media Online!

As a teacher, one of the most difficult things about your responsibility to students is teaching them real-world, real-time applications of events in history.

Elementary school students now were not even born when historically significant events such as the September 11 attacks occurred, but most of you can probably remember where you were and what you were doing on that fateful day.

So what is primary source media and how can you use these valuable tools we offer in your classroom? 

Primary Source Media Explained

Primary source media is used to teach students about events that occurred before and during their lifetime. With primary source, students as young as kindergarten can learn concepts and glean meaning from events that would otherwise be out of sight, and therefore out of mind. There are many different categories of primary source media, including but not limited to the following:

  • Personal correspondence and diaries
  • Works of art and literature
  • Speeches and oral histories
  • Audio and video recordings
  • Photographs and posters

One major advantage when using Studies Weekly is that we provide all of these different types of primary source media via our online tools as well as our award-winning 100% consumable print materials.

See It to Believe It

After logging into your teacher account at Studies Weekly, you have access to images of diary pages and letters from notable figures in history. Some of these figures include Anne Frank, Ruby Bridges and Joan Mulholland — one of the key figures in the Freedom Rides — and many more.

The only culture that our students and our kids will know about and understand is what is passed down to them from the generations before. This is what makes primary source so crucial to students now. In our weekly publications as well as our online tools, we talk about and share news images, works of art and literature.

It’s Like You’re There

Some of the greatest tools that we have in our online library are the audio and video recordings. Never been to Europe? Take a virtual field trip through Amsterdam, Germany or Paris.

Our video team is led by an award-winning director who produced our Veterans Day assembly video, and they create videos on virtually every imaginable topic. We’ve conducted interviews with many notable figures in history.

Endless Classroom Tools and Resources

We have many photographs and posters available for teachers to use in their classrooms.  Your students can analyze primary sources through observation, reflection, and questioning. Those primary sources also help to give your students an powerful understanding of the past.

Perhaps the best part about our primary source tools is that they are already included in your print subscription.

We have many teachers who have been using our publications for several years, including award-winning California teacher, Cathy Marston.  But many of our teachers are still unaware of these online tools.

If you use Studies Weekly in your classroom, but do not use the online teacher account yet, you can do so at studiesweekly.com/online.