New K-2 Leveled Readers

The K-2 New Leveled Readers are a great addition to any classroom and are perfect for guided reading sessions. Teachers can choose books that are approaching, on or above grade level for each student. Each level has a different subject to avoid comparison with their neighbor.

Accessing the Leveled Readers

To print these booklets for your students, simply log into your online account. In the blue menu bar select the “Reading” tab. Select the publication and week number. Scroll down, past the article, past the lesson plans, past the worksheets until you get to NEW Leveled Readers.

From here, download the book of your choice. Once downloaded, choose a print option.

For A Mac:

  • In printer settings go to the preview tab and choose layout.
  • Make sure the two-sided box is checked.
  • Under Two-Sided choose Short-Edge binding
  • Click print

For A PC:

  • Choose the Layout tab
  • Choose Print on Both Sides
  • In the drop-down choose Flip on Short Edge
  • Click print

The pages will print in the proper order. Simply take the page from the printer, fold it in half with the cover on the outside, staple the folded edge and your booklet is ready.

Leveled Reader Characteristics and Structure

Since our leveled readers are mainly for beginners, our layout uses large text and clear spaces between words. Each page only has about two or three simple sentences per page and we incorporate illustrations to help the reader gain understanding as they read. The content is typically on a subject that is familiar to the student and has a simple plot.

As your students begin to advance, each level increases in complexity. Start using our new leveled readers for yourself and let us know what you think in the comments. For more ELA ideas you can read our article on blending social studies with ELA.

Lesson Ideas: Blending Social Studies and ELA

One thing that we frequently discuss at Studies Weekly in our personal conversations, individual department meetings, and companywide events is the importance of social studies education. And why wouldn’t we? This is what we do every day.

To us, social studies is about more than teaching kids the states and capitals. It’s more than just learning the geography of your state or all the names and terms of the presidents. Incorporating English Language Arts into your social studies can and should be done as a richer education experience. Here are five ideas to blend ELA learning with your social studies lessons:

1. Act It Out

After reading their Studies Weekly booklets for the week, assign students a literary genre. They will then choose an article from their publication and present it to the class. For instance, they can write a poem about Christopher Columbus and recite it or act it out. Students can create a mystery story relating to the forming of their state, or a comedy sketch about the three branches of government.

Encourage students to get creative with props and the storyline, but remind them to showcase what they learned about their chosen topic.

This teaches the following ELA areas: Speaking; Writing; Reading; Listening; Analysis; Research and Citations; Art, Activities and Projects; Viewing; and Literary Genres.

2. Create a Video Journal

After reading their Studies Weekly booklets for the week, have them create video journals. This is easier to do if students have access to computers or tablets. If they don’t have access, they can create a storyboard of what would transpire in the video. The goal is not a perfect analysis of the event or the historical figure you are studying.

Video journals build fluency, prepare students for discussions, and help students practice conversation. They teach the following ELA areas: Speaking, Listening, Analysis, and Viewing.

3. Have A Debate

Set up a debate in your elementary school class. This is going to look different depending on which grade you’re teaching. A fourth grader’s understanding of the Emancipation Proclamation, for instance, will be a lot different from a sixth grader’s, but this doesn’t mean it’s impossible for them to learn it and talk about what they learned.

Have students on either side research the topic and debate the pros and cons, discuss the implications and originations of the subject, and try to come up with a compromise.

This teaches the following ELA areas: Speaking, Writing, Reading, Listening, Analysis, and Research and Citations.

4. Hold a Round Table Discussion

Have all the students choose one of the articles in the Studies Weekly booklet for that week. After thoroughly reading and analyzing the article and its subject, put all the desks or chairs in the classroom in a circle.

With their booklets in front of them, encourage the students to open up a dialogue about what they read. Encourage them to use other sources to pull information and cite from if needed to expound their point.

This teaches the following ELA areas: Speaking, Reading, Analysis, and Research and Citations.

5. Write to a Historical Pen Pal

After reading their Studies Weekly booklets for the week, have students choose a historical pen pal or when relevant, a current political figure.

Once a week, students will write to a historical figure that they have chosen to learn more about. Encourage the students to draw pictures or incorporate diagrams, and ask questions.

Once completed, pass out the letters to a different classmate and have them respond back as if they were the historical figure.

This teaches the following ELA areas: Writing, Reading, Analysis, Research and Citations, and Art, Activities, and Projects.

State Standards are Covered with Studies Weekly

At Studies Weekly, we often tout the phrase that our product is created “by teachers, for teachers.” Specifically, this means that our staff consists of veteran teachers who know what is important to you as a teacher. This includes strict compliance with state standards.

Process Ensures Standards Compliance

Each of our publications goes through a rigorous process to ensure compliance with the unique standards for your state. Recent statewide adoptions in recent months by California and Florida have proven that our publications can stand up to rigorous standards to teach your students social studies and the English Language Arts concurrently.

State Standards for Social Studies and ELA

In many schools across the country, social studies is, unfortunately, becoming a dying subject. On the other hand, English Language Arts (ELA) is still alive and well. Studies Weekly materials include many ELA standards. We designed them this way to ensure a robust and well-rounded ELA and social studies education for your students. Studies Weekly is a social studies curriculum that we designed to be taught during the literacy block.

Start Your Free Trial

Click here to start your free trial of Studies Weekly online products to see how we stack up to your state standards. You can also order a free sample of our print versions here.